Category Archives: CHILLER THAN MOST FANZINE

An in-depth analysis of the history of BOLD

An in-depth analysis of the history of BOLD, interview with Nathan Simpson (Ancient Heads) and Matt LaForge (Ancient Heads, Mil-Spec). Originally published in Chiller Than Most fanzine, issue 4 (2016). Pics by Boiling Point fanzine, Ken Salerno, No Answers fanzine, I4NI fanzine.

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CTM: How was your first time meeting BOLD? Was it love at first sight? What kind of impact did BOLD have on your life?
Nate: My first encounter with BOLD was in the winter of 1997 hearing Youth of Today’s cover of ‘Talk is Cheap’ on “Take A Stand: Live” which came out on Lost and Found. Then I heard ‘Looking Back’ on the Revelation “In Flight” sampler that spring. I liked the song, but it was definitely not what I expected. I had looked at the cover of “Speak Out” and read the description on the Revelation website so many times I was expecting it to sound like another Youth of Today. I picked up the “Looking Back” 12” in the summer of ’98 and, while I enjoyed it, I couldn’t say it was love at first sight. I then saw Matt Warnke do ‘Talk Is Cheap’ and ‘Wise Up’ at the Youth of Today reunion in June ’99 and later that summer I FINALLY got a copy of “Speak Out” (I also got “NYC Hardcore: The Way It Is” the same day) and suddenly everything made sense!! This was the BOLD I had been looking for, and I was instantly hooked. As the years have passed, I have come to prefer the Tom Capone era material. That said, “Speak Out” still slaps.
Matt: It wasn’t love at first sight. The first time I heard Bold was the track “Looking Back” on the In-Flight Program Rev sampler. For more, see my answer to your question about the 7”. I wish I could remember the moment I first saw a Bold shirt. That was love at first sight.

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CTM: The songs on Speak Out are awesome both musically and lyrically, I really like them. One of the greatest things on this record – for me – is that most every song has an awesome mosh part. Speak Out songs are not super complex, but these are very well written songs. What is your opinion about this record?
Matt: I think that’s well put: not complex but very well written. You can tell Matt had taken some lessons and learned a bit of theory. The songs tend to hang on recognizable key signatures; they’re not just exercises in throwing darts at the fretboard and hoping for the best. Which, by the way, makes them great for beginner guitar players who want to play HC. Within about two weeks of the first time I picked up a guitar with the intention of learning how to play it — this was five years ago — I was, according to a loose definition of the word “play,” “playing” along to “Clear.” The riffs had, even to my untrained ape ears, a kind of logic, which I later found an explanation for in basic theory. Way more fun than trying to get excited about playing “The House of the Rising Sun.” No shade — that’s a great song — but you know what I mean. On Speak Out Matt shows the songwriting promise that he later fulfilled.
Nate: I think Matt Warnke is an underrated song writer. As you said, the songs are simple, BUT they are incredibly catchy and well structured. They can’t help but get stuck in your head. BOLD’s appeal is build on the big sing-along chorus and Matt was an absolute master of that. I’m also a fan of how every mosh part is unique and avoids the trappings of the generic ‘mosh beat’. It doesn’t hurt when you have as an incredible drummer in Drew.

CTM: Do you like the way this record sounds? I think the quality of the recording is really low.
Nate: In a word, yes. Could it have sounded much better? Definitely. It was recorded at Electric Reels Studio, the same place Youth of Today did “Break Down The Walls” in 1986, a record that has flawless production. But something was amiss when BOLD hit the studio a year later. It’s no secret the compilation versions of ‘Talk is Cheap’ and ‘Wise Up’ smoke those on the LP. The comp version of “Wise Up” was also done at Electric Reels so I’m not sure what happened. At the end of the day, it doesn’t make a difference to me. The record is a classic, through and through.
Matt: I don’t like the way it sounds but I don’t let that bother me. I don’t let whatever relatively minor beef I have with the recording and performances ruin it. I think people can pay too much attention to that stuff. But, at any rate, no, it’s not a good recording. There’s something about the muddy sonics that gives the impression that the tempos are dragging in mud. I think it might be an aural illusion: the songs feel slow because they “sound” slow. I haven’t done a metronome test but I bet the results would be surprising. The comp versions of “Wise Up” and “Talk is Cheap” that we almost all prefer feel like they have more snap and drive, but maybe they don’t. Maybe it’s just a trick of the ears. There are ways to verify these guesses but I choose not to.

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CTM: Speak Out matrix says ‘carrot juice’. Do you know the story of this matrix?
Matt: I think Nate and Crucial John have explained the matrix to me, but I’ve forgotten the explanation. This is one of those finer points of youth-crew lore that, in my advancing age, I just don’t have the energy to internalize. The people who do the serious digging, who really work the internet hard and master all the minutiae are awe-inspiring to me. True scholars —there’s no other word for them. Me, I’m no scholar — I’m a journalist by trade, so I’m used to a much less rigorous and much more superficial model of information gathering and information spreading.
Nate: That’s an inside joke about a local health food store the guys would frequent.

CTM: BOLD self titled seven inch. It is pretty insane how quickly they progressed as a band from 1986-1989, people couldn’t get over how much BOLD changed from ‘Speak Out’ the previous year, to this 7 inch. While Tom Capone was doing Beyond, Matt heard their demo and he called him to join them after their summer 1988 west coast tour. BOLD at that time were looking to progress and rock, so he was a great choice for the band. What do you think about this record?
Nate: It’s funny how the focus only ever seems to be on the difference between “Speak Out” and the 7”. Everyone forgets about the differences between “Join Our Fight” and “Speak Out”. In a short time the songs became much more complex and interesting. And this trend naturally continued throughout the band’s tenure. “Speak Out” infamously took a long time to finally be released, well after those songs were written and recorded. While the public was hearing these songs for the first time in 1988, they were already considered old to the band. As I said above, Matt is an excellent song writer, and when he teamed up with Tom Capone, a bonafide shredder, it was only natural that they would continue to refine their sound and take it to the next level. I absolutely love the 7” and all of the songs from the Baby Monster sessions. The song “Speak Out” is my favorite BOLD track.
Matt: The 7” is easily Bold’s best record. In fact, I think it’s difficult to argue against the proposition that the 7” is the best record that the youth crew produced. Of course you can argue otherwise, but doing so is difficult — an uphill battle against taste and Kantian aesthetics. I didn’t always think this way. For one thing, my early exposure to later Bold was not via the 7” itself but via the Looking Back record and, before that, “Looking Back,” the song, which I heard on the In-Flight Program Revelation sampler from ’97. Looking Back is a much weaker record than the 7”. The extra three songs aren’t in the same league as the main four. “Speak Out” and “Looking Back” are soft and shapeless, to my ear, with lyrics that are fine in their own right but pretty pedestrian compared to the sharpness and specificity of the lyrics on the 7” songs. And the “Always Try” redux is a fun novelty but totally inessential. So you’ve got two tiers of quality on Looking Back, and the lower-tier songs clog up the middle section of the record and dilute the Big Four’s power. That’s my take, anyway. I know Nate will aggressively disagree. “Speak Out” is his favourite Bold song, and he’s always stood by Looking Back. At any rate, it wasn’t until I heard the 7” itself — which didn’t happen until an embarrassingly late date, some time in the late ’90s or maybe even the early 2000s — that I got with the program. The other thing that had turned me off was Matt’s interview in that book All Ages, which I read not long after it was published in ’97, when I was 17. In answer to a question about the 7”, he says something along the lines of “That’s the one record I’ll play when people ask me about the band. That’s the one I stand behind.” At the time, I resented him for that comment. I took it as an implicit denigration not only of Speak Out but of simple straight-edge hardcore in general. How could he say that?! How could he hold up the later era — which, keep in mind, I associated with Looking Back, not the actual four-song record he was talking about — as the only incarnation of the band worthy of posterity? I was too young, stupid, and over-sensitive to understand where Matt was coming from and what he meant. But I carried that resentment with me, along with my lukewarm feelings about Looking Back, for a long time. I was a knee-jerk Speak Out partisan until well into my 20s. Not anymore. The 7” is a masterpiece. Next question.

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CTM: Drew said in an interview that if Zulu or Tim Brooks played on this last record it would have been a hell of a lot different. What do you think about his personal opinion?
Matt: Drew is a musician, and in that comment he’s giving a pretty frank indication of his opinion of Zulu and Tim as musicians. My guess is he remembers the writing and recording of the 7” as a special process, which involved only the three band members who had the talent, sophistication, and technical ability required to realize any specific vision period, let alone a nuanced and ambitious vision such as what emerged on the 7”. Zulu and Tim would have needed to be accommodated, Drew is saying — their limited playing ability and/or their limited imaginations. Maybe he’s wrong about them, but I’ve no doubt he’s sincere in his belief. He probably remembers that record as a moment in his life when things really came together and something special happened. We all have those moments in our lives, but they’re vanishingly few. So we hold them dear, romanticize them, and marvel at their improbability: “If that one little thing hadn’t happened, then the whole outcome would have been different. Why did everything go right?”
Nate: Without additional context that is a difficult question to answer. If he meant “If Tom Capone didn’t play on this record” then yes, it would have likely sounded more similar to “Speak Out”. But I think it ultimately comes down to who is writing the tracks. I’m not sure Zulu and Tim would have made much a difference. But this is all speculation. I’m happy that it turned out the way it did.

CTM: I mean their lyrics changed a lot from time to time, from “I just know what my scene’s like and I think it fucking rules” to emotional lyrics like “Change within” and “Today we live”. They were all about 14 and 15 years old when they started the band, so I think that they just wanted to be the little brothers of Youth of Today, they just wanted to be a simple cookie-cutter hardcore band without originality and their lyrics on the Crippled Youth EP definitely are reflective of that. As time went on, they started writing about how they were really feeling and they tried to reconcile the experiences out in the wilderness of the world. What do you think about their lyrics?
Nate: I think it’s being harsh and unfair to say “they just wanted to be a simple cookie-cutter hardcore band without originality.” I disagree with that statement completely. What more do you expect from a 13 year-old? Matt hadn’t even had the chance to live the experiences he would later sing of, let alone be to expected to articulate them lyrically.
Matt: The lyrics are good but unremarkable until the 7”. The lyrics on the 7” are as moving and surprising and direct and unfussy as a great John Cheever story.

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CTM: ‘You’re The Friend I Don’t Need’ is probably one of the most bizarre lyrics ever because this song was actually written about Drew by Matt. What are your feelings about this song?
Nate: It’s not as bizarre as you may think. Ian MacKaye wrote the entire “Out of Step” album sitting across the table from Jeff Nelson in Dischord house. It’s a great song. Think about how many hours/days/weeks the two of them spent together. And for Matt to feel that way about someone he considered one of his closest friends. Put yourself in that situation. As powerful as it is heartbreaking.
Matt: I think that if we knew how many songs were written, in fits of malice, pique, or jealousy, by one band member about a fellow band member, the number would shock us. Or maybe it wouldn’t. It probably shouldn’t: there’s a long tradition in rock of intra-band subtweeting-via-lyrics, “Go Your Own Way” being the most famous example. What do I think of the fact that “You’re the Friend I Don’t Need” was written by Matt about Drew? I think it’s heartbreaking. I’ve heard a lot of stories from credible sources about the circumstances that gave rise to the song, but I can’t pretend to know what really happened or what was in either guy’s head before, during, and after the composition of the lyrics. All I know is that every one of us has lost close friendships that we thought would last forever. We all know how it feels to suddenly, fall out with someone whom we’ve loved and with whom we’ve shared important, intense periods of our lives. It’s one of the most painful things a person can go through. Think about how long Drew and Matt knew each other, how young they were when they met, how much they went through together, how much the music they created together has meant to people. Think about how much intimacy and love would be produced by all that. And then picture the day when that intimacy and love suddenly became inaccessible to both of them. Even when a friendship degrades gradually, the final separation is always sudden. Listen, if you’re not at this very moment, while reading this, mentally screening a montage of the rise and fall of Drew and Matt’s friendship in the ’80s, and if the soundtrack to that montage is not “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother,” and if you’re not currently on the verge of tears, I don’t know what’s wrong with you.

CTM: Do you have a favourite break down in any BOLD song? Which one is probably the best and why?
Nate: I’m not sure if I could pick one that is the “best”, but one of my favorite breakdowns is in ‘Running Like Thieves’, which some may find surprising. ‘Always Try’ (“Speak Out” version) is another one. The cymbal crash into the bass part followed by Matt’s vocals (“…will al-ways fuck-ing try!”) is stirring before it drops right out into that crunchy-hard outro. One of the best BOLD songs.
Matt: I love the holler in “Change Within.” You can’t argue with the bounce of “Talk is Cheap”’s breakdown. But the “Change Within” holler is my take. Somewhat related: The best transition out of a Bold breakdown is in Running Like Thieves. When the beat picks back up, with Capone playing that little pentatonic theme… man. You could listen the song 12 times a day for the rest of your life and that moment would never cease to thrill.

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CTM: What are your favourite BOLD live sets and why?
Matt: The set at the Anthrax where Zulu plays in sunglasses. I love that move by Zulu — an act of whimsy that feels ahead of its time, the kind of gag I’d see in the ’90s and 2000s but don’t associate with the ’80s when everything was still pretty earnest. The youth crew bands are my favourites but there’s an element of self-seriousness in their aesthetics that I enjoying seeing pierced from time to time. Zulu’s shades piece it. “We’re serious about this band, but these sunglasses should tell you a lot about what we’re like offstage.”
Nate: My favorite live set is BOLD’s first show in Washington D.C. at the Safari Club in January 1988. It’s BOLD in their prime, playing as a five-piece (with Zulu) and just absolutely crushing it. Entire room is a mosh pit. Matt’s swagger is at an all-time high (“Don’t be afraid to come up and talk to us. I’d especially like to extend that to all the girls that are here.”) Great stage banter from both Matt as well as the sound man (“Everybody up on stage do a Houdini — disappear!”). An early version of ‘Looking Back’ called ‘Start Again’ is played with a completely different set of lyrics. An incredible set.

CTM: A lot of people don’t like live recordings of hardcore bands, they are deemed as too steril or raw. One of the reasons that I love listening to live sets is because sometimes you can catch genius stage banters, memorable quotes, memorable moments. What are your favourites? Do you like the Mark rap intro for BOLD (The Anthrax Norwalk CT 02 07 1987) ?
Matt: Yes, I love Mark’s rap intro. It’s a damn sight better than the Turning Point rap intro, from the latterday set in, I believe, DC. I always thought that TP thing was a little snarky. I’ll give you my favourite piece of Matt banter. Once again, it’s from the Zulu-in-shades set at the Anthrax. Roughly paraphrased: “Let’s get everyone up front so people can stagedive on you and then you can stagedive on them, et cetera.” That “et cetera” fucking kills me.
Nate: Live sets are such a valuable source of information. I think its so cool to hear early/alternate versions of songs (as mentioned above), or hearing songs that were played live but never recorded (i.e. ‘Till The End’ by Chain of Strength). I’m a fan of Mark Ryan and Supertouch, but as far as that rap intro goes…lets just say I think his mic skills were far better suited to HC.

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BOLD with Mark Ryan (Supertouch)

CTM: BOLD reunited in 2005 with Matt on vocals, Tom on guitar, Brooks on bass and Vinny Panza on drums. Porcell who periodically played with the band in the 80s, joined on second guitar. Did you catch them on these reunion shows? I had the pleasure to see them in Austria and Italy, I loved how they updated some of their songs or made little changes in subtle ways. The Vienna show is a great memory for me, we went into the club early that day to hang out. The guys allowed us to check out their soundcheck which was great, and the show was really bad ass. One of my friends lost his tooth and another friend of mine broke his x-rated swatch. Do you have any memories of BOLD reunions?
Nate: I will leave this question to Matt who has one of my favorite BOLD stories.
Matt: I caught this lineup once, at Posi Numbers ’05 in Wilkes-Barre’s world-famous inflatable sports dome. They rocked pretty hard, opened with Running Like Thieves to racucous moshing. But it’s difficult to mention that set without also mentioning the 65-yard Vinny Testaverde-esque spiral that Matt effortlessly tossed when for some reason — possibly related to the gig being held in an inflatable sports dome — a football found its way onstage mid-song. Lets all take a moment to remember and appreciate that spiral.

CTM: Livewire Records worked on a live record (‘Watch As Time Moves Past’) and they wanted to release a new BOLD 7 inch too. These records never saw the light of day but as far as I know they recorded a rehearsal tape with new songs. Have you ever heard these songs?
Nate: I have never heard these songs and hopefully never will. I know the band wasn’t happy with the songs so one can only imagine how terrible they are.
Matt: I have not and I’m not losing sleep over that. I don’t think they had another classic record in them. I say that as a devoted fan.

CTM: Top3 BOLD tees?
Matt: Speak Out — Yellow and red on black. Yes, it’s a bootleg, yes it’s just a repurposing of the LP logo, but it’s perfect. / The dark-on-white logo shirt Cappo is wearing in his “fallback” jump photo from We’re Not in This Alone’s layout. You remember “It’s gotta be the shoes”? Well, it had to be the shirt. / Not Join The fight. I do not care for the Join The Fight design. I realize you didn’t ask to name a shirt I don’t like, but I wanted to take this opportunity to get my feisty take on the public record.
Nate: In no particular order: Summer Tour ’89 — BOLD forewent the traditional full tour back print for a subtle “Summer Tour ’89” under a pocket print Rev Star. The gold print on the front perfectly compliments the regal purple of the BOLD on the reverse side, partially layered on top of Alex Brown’s iconic back cover photo. / Join The Fight — Simply one of the most iconic HC tees ever printed. There’s a reason Porcell is wearing it on the cover of “Bringin’ It Down”. / BOLD Fan Made Bootleg — White tee with BOLD in yellow and black collegiate lettering. A very small number were made by some fans of the band. Highly sought after grail — even for a boot.

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Nathan and Matt

 

Jaguarz North End Jammin’

Originally published in Chiller Than Most fanzine, issue 2 (2014).

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Owen Black: I’ve been asked to write something about the band and the era during which our North End Jammin’ rehearsal tape was recorded. This was a great time for Jaguarz. Our lineup had solidified with the addition of one of my favorite people, Rich Perusi, on drums. Jeff Pickett was our guitarist (from jump) and Steve St. Germain a/k/a Steb, singer of the Straight Edge powerhouse The First Step, was our bass player. By my count that is three lead singers in the band; Rich sang for The Dedication and Sex Positions before and after his career with Stop And Think — a choice draft pick for sure. We had a new practice space in Boston’s North End. Three members of the band were pursuing scholarship at the prestigious Boston University. We were playing out as often as possible. We were eating and living well.

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As far as being the most underrated Lockin’ Out band, I don’t know what to say. We adhered to an old school ethic. We didn’t have a website because Straight Ahead didn’t have a website. We bonded often over endless plates of chow in the Warren Towers cafeteria. We maintained a solid crew of moshers who supported us at shows. I’d shout them all out but they know who they are. It was the golden era of Lockin’ Out, and I have endless gratitude for everything that entails.

2004 was only our second year of existence, and we played our last show in 2005. Were we writing for a 12″ EP titled “What’s That Noise?”? Maybe. Did we have a bunch of new songs? Yes. My favorite ones were called “Bad Things,” “Better Days,” and “An Hour of Wolves.” The Wolves joint was going to make “Survival” sound like Crippled Youth jamming on Playskool instruments. A 12-minute dirge was planned for side B. Some of these songs used to exist on my hard drive in various stages of completion, but they’ve sadly been lost. A few years ago Steve hit me up and suggested we record them, but we never did. Oh well.

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This rehearsal, I believe, was in preparation for a jaunt down south to Virginia and back during our spring break and boy, how I wish it could have lasted forever. We had a new intro in our playbook, affectionately called “TNT” due to its explosive mosh demands, and partially due to its similarity to a certain AC/DC tune. AC/DC is a rock ‘n roll band, I don’t know if you’ve heard of them, but maybe look into their catalogue or peek behind the music. They’ve written a few riffs over the years, and suffered a tragic loss of their first lead singer, Bon Scott. We were also practicing a segment of a song by another rock band that exists outside of the hardcore realm, Smashing Pumpkins. They are from Chicago, the city where I was born, and also lost a band member, Jimmy Chamberlain, years ago. RIP to these influential musicians. But I don’t mean to get all heavy on you right now. “Cherub Rock” is a real vibey song and we jammed that intro straight into our hit “Survival” during our set on this tape. We never played a cover for more than a few shows, though, so I’m really glad this was captured because unless you were in that Brick, New Jersey D.A.V. hall on our spring break tour, the full effect of this jam would be attainable only at the end of, nay, beyond, a pipe dream tunnel that few of you would ever emerge healthily from. I’m not even sure I have. Let me just add that Get Real covered “Blind” by KoRn at this show so cheers to the ’90s.

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Close Call and Confusion / Live on WNYU’s Crucial Chaos

Interview with Michael Scondotto. Originally released in Chiller Than Most fanzine, issue 4.

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CTM – What are your memories of this classic radio program?
Michael Scondotto – It was an extremely important component of the NYHC scene during its time. I had first learned about Crucial Chaos from the kids who got me into Hardcore in early 1988. The very first one I listened to was the Supertouch/Murphy’s Law set on St. Patricks Day in March of 1988. It was like being at a show, only all you could do was listen! It sounded like a big party when the live portion would kick in. It also gave bands from all over great exposure.

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Close Call / Confusion WNYU sessions:
Michael Scondotto – The Close Call one was in the spring of 1989, I was the bass player for both Close Call and Confusion. I remember it was really nice weather, so it may have been May. The radio show ran 90 minutes, but the bands got to play during the last 30 minutes. I remember that we practiced a lot in preparation for the set so we would be really tight, which we were for a band of 15 to 17 year old kids. It was a badge of honor for us, we were young and didn’t know a lot of people outside of our own Brooklyn crew, which I think worked against us a bit. We brought down a bunch of friends to watch and cheer for us. Close Call had one demo out at this point, and we were working on demo #2. I remember that Spermicide was cool to us, as was Johnny Stiff. With Confusion, we played in February of 1992, it was freezing out, that I do recall well. We had a ton of our friends with us and they were pretty loud and crazy. Spermicide was gone by this point and Johnny ran the show. He is a good guy, funny and one of a kind. Although the NYHC landscape changed from 89 to 92 considerably, the vibe at Crucial Chaos was still the same – a fun night of live Hardcore for the radio. Biggest difference between say a live club show and one for the radio is that for me personally, I played better and tighter for Crucial Chaos! You knew it would make the rounds back then.


Getting to play on Crucial Chaos back then was a kind of milestone for a Hardcore band.
It meant that there were people who wanted to check out your music, that you had some good word of mouth about your band. Close Call broke up before we really got to play a bunch of shows, we did about 4 plus the WNYU set! But Confusion went on to do more and play some great shows and record a 7″ that many seem to enjoy. I’m grateful and humbled that people care about those times. I stopped playing bass by 1995 and became a vocalist. I currently sing in two different Hardcore bands, Inhuman and The Last Stand.

CTM – What are your favorite Crucial Chaos sets?
Michael Scondotto – I think the Murphy’s Law/Supertouch one was amazing. The one from Uppercut as really cool too. Dmize have a great one out there as well. I also think that the Close Call and Confusion ones are killer, people need to seek those out.

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The Psychos interview

Steve Psycho is a former member of the infamous Psychos one of the bands that ruled the early days of New York Hardcore. I believe the interview was made around 2005, and originally released in I Drink Milk fanzine and Chiller Than Most newsletter #1. Interview made by Laszlo Nanyista. Pics by Mincey/Levy, Jessica Bard, The Godfathers of Hardcore documentary.

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Could you tell us a little bit about your background? How did you first come in contact with the hardcore punk scene? Steve – 1979. I was listening to The Ramones, The Pistols, The Clash, the Slits and some other punk rock. My friends and I were just starting to get really excited about more underground stuff. Then someone got hold of the Black Flag “Miltown High” album and I had found SLF’s “Hanx”- those raw sounds encouraged us to find more music of that type. The first show I saw was The Bad Brains, The False Prophets, and maybe The Stimulators and The Offals at Botany 500 – a small bar in the NYC wholesale flower district. There was this huge black guy in a white t-shirt and across the back of the shirt written in black magic marker was “You bet I’ve got something personal against you”. It was Mojo (of “Egg raid on Mojo fame”). I went to see any band that identified as punk or hardcore, hung out at Max’s Kansas City and CB’s and began meeting more and more people. Except for 1 friend none of my friends was really into hardcore as a scene or a lifestyle. I found myself very attracted to the ideas and energy I was being exposed to and spent more and more time at clubs that featured this music. I’d regularly cruise by Bleeker Bob’s for new vinyl.

How did the formation of the Psychos come about? Were you a founding member or did you join later? Steve – Stu (Larry), Billy Psycho and Roger Miret had already formed the band when I met Stu. He had been singing and playing guitar and they were looking for a singer so he could expand the guitar parts. I fit in pretty well and I was also a source for lyrics as I had a bunch of ideas and some verse already written.

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How many shows did you play with the Psychos? Steve – The Psychos generally played about once a month while I was singing. We did A7, CBGB’s, The Rock Hotel (with Void and Scream – to this day Void is one of my favorite bands). This was from 1982- 1984 and it was a time when hardcore bands were being shut out of a lot of NY clubs. I remember doing a show in a basement in Williamsburg, Bklyn with the Dicks and others but the show was set up, done and then the location couldn’t be used again. It was tough for me to travel because I had a 7-day a week job (not a slave to the clock – I loved the work and had a great boss who was well ahead of the curve in profit sharing!), which eliminated the idea of touring. Later on I think the Psychos had a more intense schedule largely due to Roger’s influence.

The lineup of the band: Steve -Stu and maybe Billy were later in Trip 6. I’ve been told Stu ended up dusted out and going to jail for some very brutal assaults. Billy was in the band Death Before Dishonor just long enough to get a tattoo then got kicked out. I sang and played some bass in a Jersey band called Swine Dive in the late 80’s. Roger started singing for Agnostic Front and Stu and I thought it would be best to find another bass player so we got a friend of mine named Fil (who now holds a PHD and teaches American History). After Fil and I left The Psychos, Roger rejoined on bass along with a series of singers. Roger always felt slighted for being replaced in the band – although we are still friends. The feeling was that he wouldn’t have time to commit to both bands and that his priority would be AF. HA! Little did I know that Roger would turn into the workhorse he is. Singing and playing in 3 bands at any given time (The Disasters, Lady Luck, etc.), founding the Rumblers Car Club, producing other bands, his own clothing line – he’s a true self made man – a working class hero. For my part – when I left the Psychos in 1984 I was pretty much done with hardcore. I loved the music I had been listening to and I loved hanging out, but as a continued lifestyle it wouldn’t really have worked out for me. I could see myself becoming a casualty somewhere down the line. I also had no interest in the newer bands.

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Funny stories/memories: Steve – We would have to search for Billy before rehearsals. He was usually found lying on the sidewalk or in a doorway somewhere on the Lower East Side or around The Bowery, unbathed in the 3 or 4 days since the last rehearsal or show and smelling pretty rank. He would have to be cleaned up because you couldn’t breath if you were in the same room with him. Once he told us the night before he had sex with a high school girl who had defecated on his chest. He said it was the wildest sex he’d ever had but she kicked him out before he could shower. We eventually had to find a rehearsal space with an isolated drum room because he always smelled so bad. I met my wife at CBGB’s after an Abused matinee. The girlfriends of Kevin (vocals) and Dave (bass), both named Valerie and my future wife came out of CB’s all flushed and sweaty. They had just beaten the crap out of some guy who had been acting out and was annoying everyone. He dropped his pants in front of the girls and they proceeded to beat him, cracking some ribs. They kicked him repeatedly with steel toe boots. The 2 Valeries introduced me to their friend Gayle. Later at a house party she said 2 things to me: “That’s my comic book you’re reading, put it back when you’re done” and “Do you want a beer?” – we were living together a year later and have been married for over 22 years. We have 3 daughters. Most shows we played were $5 dollars to get in. I always felt weird having a couple people on the guest list and leaving out others. Usually I would pay on the side for a bunch of people and then tell them they were on the guest list, so everyone felt special. I think a lot of people were attracted to hardcore or “the scene” because they were excluded from other areas of society. It made sense to me that a Psychos show was a place everyone could feel included. Most times I sprang for $20 – which was about what my cut of the door was if we were lucky, but once at a show I ended up laying out almost a hundred bucks. I had a decent job, made good money – I was just playing for the fun of it and it was more fun if everyone got in. I had laid out the money for the first run of t-shirts the Psychos did. I gave so many away I had no chance of getting my money back – forget a profit – not much of a businessman! But these were my friends. I never felt quite right introducing filthy commerce into the relationship.

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A7/Tompkins Square Park: Steve – There was a real period of tension between the punks who arrived on the Lower East Side and the residents, mostly Hispanics. I can tell you that one night hanging outside of A7 a friend and myself were shot at, but I couldn’t say who or where it came from. Early on there were few people hanging out so you’re really just an oddity to the locals. Then more people show up, and tension rises. As time went by we started moving into the neighborhood and our numbers increased and the dynamic changed again as we became the regulars. I would guess it’s a pretty common cycle of gentrification. A friend had gotten hold of some white blotter stamps of acid that someone just handed to him. He gave hits away to friends until that night there were about 150 people hanging in and around Tompkins Square Park tripping on acid and drinking 40’s. I remember just standing there listening to the buzz of the crowd, it felt like a beehive, just buzzing and humming with conversation and activity. A grey car pulled up at the corner, some kind of Lincoln Town Car or Cadillac – huge American metal- and a bunch of guys leaned out the windows yelling at us and cursing before driving away with us chasing them. Some time later a grey-ish Volkswagen or Subaru – maybe even Le Car – some compact shit, pulls up to the same light and somebody yells, “ There they are” and a bunch of people attack the car beating on it and trying to turn it over. I remember standing there thinking; “ok its sort of the same color but wasn’t the first car bigger”? The people in the second car must have been shitting!
You would see the cops scatter as soon as it got dark; they didn’t want any part of LES after 8PM. We mostly traveled in small groups when heading into Alphabet City in the small hrs (Hence the name of the SIN Club, Safety In Numbers) and I preferred walking in the street so someone couldn’t attack me by hiding in a doorway or by coming out of an abandoned building. My wife was heading down Ave B one night about half a block behind someone who was carrying a guitar. A man stepped out from the shadows, stabbed the guy and walked away with the guitar.

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Unified Right interview (2013) by Chiller Than Most fanzine

I started working on the 1st issue of Chiller Than Most fanzine in July 2013, and did my first CTM interview ever with Unified Right shortly after. They were probably the most influential band for me in the last 5 years, these guys made a huge impact on me and their lyrics made me a better person. “Dedicated to those who hate I offer you love because I see all your pain.” Unified Right 2013-2019


This interview originally published in Chiller Than Most fanzine, issue 1 (2013). Pics by Kiabad Meza, Dan Rawe, Casey Wisenbaker, David Burns, Angela Owens.

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CTM – How was Unified Right born? What was the inspiration for the band, who is in it, and what are the goals? What was your motivation to start this band?
Branden: It started in April of last year when Oliver and me really got serious about starting a band but it didn’t actually happen until we got together with Corey after his band Slow Burn played their last show and we just hit it off. We wrote a 3 song demo under the name Payback in November of last year. We played a few shows and eventually decided we could write better songs. So we did and changed the name to Unified Right which we felt fit the tone of the band a lot better. We were just inspired to write unity jams in a style that we all get down with. The band is Oliver on guitar, Zulu Shane on bass, Corey on drums and me Branden on mic. We just wanna play as much as possible and write new songs when we can. Our main goal and ultimately our motivation is to just be a fresh presence in our scene.

CTM – Who came up with the name of the band and does it have a special meaning?
Oliver: I’d like to start off by acknowledging the fact that a lot of people like to joke about our name. A lot of white power references seem to get thrown around and what our name actually means could not be any farther from that. Branden and I came up with the name in a Little Ceasars parking lot. We’d previously played under the name Payback and didn’t really feel like it was a representation of who we are as people and what our band is all about. The name Unified Right is very significant to all of us. If your ideas, outlook, and image stray from the norm of the scene that you’re in, it shouldn’t dictate whether or not you’re accepted. Anybody that has a good heart and a true desire to get into this shit has the right to feel unified. The unified right.

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CTM – When was your first show and how was it like?
Branden: Our first show was a disaster. We forgot alot of equipment, Oliver had to barrow a pic. We blasted through 4 songs in 2.5 minutes and no one seemed to be feeling it. Overall pretty good.

CTM – Your demo was released on tape format. Five awesome songs in 4.5 minutes. Solid ground. What are your influences?
Branden: We didn’t write songs with any sound or band in mind, we just wrote some shit that we felt was sick. Some bands that influence us in everything we do not just music would be Rest In Pieces, Straight Ahead, Madball (7″), AF, and NY Wolfpack.

CTM – Are you satisfied with the results and how have been the reactions so far?
Branden: The last few shows we’ve played have been killer. Lots of friends and good mosh.

CTM – What are your future plans?
Branden: We got a song coming out on a comp and we’re planning on crapping out another tape in the next few months and maybe a live tape. Just keep playin to the people.

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CTM – What is the lyrical content of Unified Right?
Oliver: Unity, individuality, a feeling of dissatisfaction in your immediate surroundings, and being honest with yourself are all things we’ve hit on. I think some may say that the topics we like to talk about have been “played out” but I believe they are as relevant as ever. Branden writes the majority of the lyrics but we all have an input on them and we just write what feels natural. Nothing is forced.

CTM – Digital music is something you have, but a demo tape or record is something you own. Do we still need demo tapes and records in the digital age? What do you thinkabout it?
Branden: The internet is sick. I love that i can listen to basically any band i want whenever i want, but actually owning it is another level of cool.
Oliver: Demo tapes are the life’s blood of the hardcore scene.

CTM – Powerhouse was the first youth crew hardcore band in South Florida. They published a demo tape in 1989 and a seven inch on New Age Records. “Use your brain” is awesome, please cover this song!
Oliver: New Age Records #03 brah! I think Powerhouse rules. My fingers are crossed that I’ll get to see ’em this saturday but it’s looking like my work schedule is gonna fuck that up.

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CTM – I saw a hardcore band in my environment where members liked different type of music. They were thinking differently about music and they were not able to progress. Do you think it’s important for a band of individuals to all have the same beliefs and ideas?
Oliver: I believe that differing ideas and beliefs are what really spices up life and I guess it can both help and hurt a band. But really it’s all about being an individual so diversity is cool. I think it’s cool for the band members do be into their own sorta shit but I’ll tell ya I don’t like hearing genre confusion. I like a unified sound.

CTM – What’s your definition of “Hard” in hardcore? What makes a band a hardcore band in your opinion?
Oliver: Ultimately… No Rules. You dictate yourself within hardcore. There’s a lot of room for self expression and if you’re aware of that opportunity then you’re hard as shit.

CTM – How do you feel about all the reunion shows that keep happening, most recently Judge?
Oliver: Sometimes reunions can be a total bust or just kinda whack but I watched the footage from the Judge set and it looked sick as hell. I personally think a band like Altercation reuniting is fuckin wild and cool. Breakdown still sounds awesome. I don’t feel too strongly either way honestly.

CTM – What’s something about hardcore that you hope always stays the same and what’s something about hardcore that you would change?
Oliver: Hardcore is what you make it and I wouldn’t wanna change a damn thing about the way I’ve made it. That’ll always stay the same. I guess just some of the incenseritu and trend hopping that goes on. That’s pretty dumb but at the same time pretty inevitable. Just stick to the shit that gets you pumped.

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CTM – TOP 5 charismatic frontmans (2008-2013):
Oliver- Branden Stepp: Stompin, hair flowin, skankin about, obviously feels the music within his soul and has my favorite on-stage banter. A real privilege to share the stage with him.
Zizzack: Jumpin around, moshin about, really delivering to the people and always wearing crucial joints.
Crucial John: Groovin hard. I love Give more and more every time I get to see them.
Jeff Perlin: He may no longer be wearing a Murphys Law belly shirt but the boy’s still got it. I saw the 87′ demo lineup live in 2012 TWICEthat’s wild.
Josh P: He fronts the best band of the 00’s.

CTM – TOP 5 demo tapes (2008-2013):
Oliver: Gonna try to stick with more recent releases to maintain relevancy…
Free Spirit Demo: Refreshing. So ill sounding. That hot air balloon diagram is such an awesome looking cover. Truly an eye opening couple of tracks to a lot of younger kids (including myself).
Intent “No Rules” Demo: The sickest shit I’d heard in a minute. Rough, raw, and real. Still can’t stop listening.
WW4 8 Song Demo: Absolutely fucking deadly and who the fuck on earth doesn’t wanna see Mark Porter writing new jams?
Big Contest Demo: Insightful and dark. A real sense of urgency. Straight to the point tracks each one being a mosher’s delight. Their first gig is tonight excited to hear about it. Gil is a great frontman.
No Tolerance Demo ’08: Scary fuckin straight edge tracks. The shit I like to hear. This demo will the stand the test of time.

CTM – I mean the beach is definitely at the top of cool things in Florida. What are the coolest things to do in the Florida area?
Oliver: The number one beach in the US is in our hometown. Yeah the beach is pretty cool. Swim around, get tan, look at hot girls, play frisbee. Bridge jumping is pretty sick here. We got this cool spot called Short Stop that’s good to get snacks at. We just try to practice and get food, hit a show whenever there is one. Unified Right is big into swimming in all sorts of bodies of water.

CTM – Thanks for your time guys. Any last words?
Olver: Naw. Peace.

Outburst photos / Joe Songco

Originally published in Chiller Than Most fanzine, issue 6 (2018).

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CTM – 01. You played your first show with Abombanation, Krakdown, Token Entry at Right Track Inn in late 1987. As far as I know it was an amazing show where Ray Parada was covered in blood from busting his nose open during Outburst set. What are your memories of the first Outburst show?

Joe Songco – The Right Track Inn was this cool little club in Merrick, Long Island. That’s our original bassist Chris Bruno in that shot. I think it may have been ABombANation’s first show too. Rayco and Matt were also from around the way in Astoria and they were regular visitors to our south side of Astoria Park from the Ditmars Boulevard side. I sure do remember Rayco busting his nose open. Personally, it was awesome that he was dancing for us and fortunately he was okay to go up and do ABombANation’s set! I remember loving their melodic sound. I believe it was Jay Krakdown who got us on that bill. They were always so sick with their live show. I remember introducing myself to their drummer John Soldo because his cousin Christina was my classmate and good friend at St. John’s Prep. Along with Leeway, Kraut & Murphy’s Law, Token Entry were one of the established neighborhood bands so it was great to be playing with them. I remember being really nervous doing the long Johnny Feedback snare roll in “All Twisted” at the end of our set because Ernie was watching from the side. I grew up watching all those great Astoria drummers and I didn’t want to botch it!

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CTM – 02. Outburst with Walter Schreifels on bass

Joe Songco – That was our first CBGB gig in December ’87. Breakdown was supposed to headline but had to cancel so we played with American Standard, Department of Corruption and Atrocity. Our bassist Chris had a family trip he was unable to get out of. Chris and Brian were friends with all the Jackson Heights guys in Gorilla Biscuits & Token Entry. Luckily, Walter offered to fill in on bass and I remember he learned the songs really quickly. Aside from GB, he’d already played for Warzone & Youth of Today so his chops were really good. I’m so glad someone snapped that picture to evidence the time Walter played in Outburst!

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CTM – 03. What’s the story of this Outburst photo? Where and when did you take this photo?

Joe Songco – This was taken on the campus of Columbia University in Manhattan. Our roadie and former high school classmate Julio (to my right in the black leather jacket) had gone to Columbia after high school and he invited us one night to come party at his school.

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CTM – 04. Basketball…

Joe Songco – This was taken in Long Island City, which is a neighborhood on one side of the Queensboro Bridge (on the other side is the famous hip hop neighborhood Queensbridge Projects, home of Nas, Mobb Deep, Roxanne Shante, Marley Marl, etc). Jay and his brother Al were big time basketball fans like me and we often got together to hit the courts. On this day, Brian and one of our other roadies Carlos joined us and we played all afternoon. What’s really cool about this shot is I’m wearing the original Run DMC & Beastie Boys “Together Forever” tour shirt. Eminem also wears this shirt in his video for “Berzerk”.

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CTM – 05. CBGB…

Joe Songco – I’m pretty sure this CBGB show was with Breakdown in ’88. That’s Eric Fink from Side By Side/Uppercut about to launch himself into the crowd off of Brian’s back. This photo was taken by the legendary BJ Papas. I remember during our cover of Kraut’s “All Twisted”, Gavin from Absolution/Burn took the mic and sang the whole second verse.

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CTM – 06. Remembering Elkin

Joe Songco – Elkin just roadied the NYC area Outburst shows. Just a few blocks away from CBGB was St. Mark’s Pizza. We’d usually go there after shows or if we had some time in between bands. “Gotta get that extra cheese slice!” he would say, every time. He loved how they would put a handful of mozzarella on top of any slice with a topping before it went into the oven. That’s all he ever needed as payment for his services. Our roadie, my homie.

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Freddy Alva interview (Abombanation/New Breed compilation/Some Records etc.)

Freddy Alva interview originally published in Chiller Than Most fanzine, issue 3 (2014).

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CTM – Can you give us a lesson about the history of Abombanation? Do you have any info how did Abombanation form originally? What was their lineup? As far as I know Ernie Parada (Token Entry) played drums for them only on the demo and at one or two gigs at most. In Your Face Steve played with the band after the demo until the end and actually sang during one show after Ray Parada.
Freddy – I just asked Ray on the origins of the band & he said that the original members were himself on vocals, Matt O’Brien on guitar, Vadim on bass & Larry “Love” Kaplan on drums. He can’t remember exactly when they formed but I’m guessing it’s early 1987. He said Vadim was then replaced by Nick X& Ernie Parada replaced Larry on drums when Larry joined Breakdown in 1988.

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CTM – Are there any particular shows that stuck in your memory?
Freddy – I only saw A-Bomb-A-Nation once at CBGB’s& was lucky to sit in for a practice at Monkey Hill studios in Queens. The CBGB’s show was memorable because a lot of HC kids from Queens showed up to support a band from our neighborhood. I knew Vadim through Chris Wynne from In Effect fanzine & it was really cool seeing a lot of friends on the audience. The band was awesome, I’ve seen a couple of cool pics from that show, seem to remember someone filming it, hope that video pops up someday.

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CTM – The Abombanation demo, to me, sounds much more like a typical NYHC band of the time. We can hear standard fast parts and dance parts, but also a surprisingly distinct sense of melody. What do you think of the band’s sound? How did that differ from previous bands and attempts?
Freddy – I agree that their sound was very different from other NYHC bands at the time. Besides the other, band members, musical skills. I will credit singer Ray Parada for their atypical sound. Ray was an original class of 1982 HC scenester: he’d gone to the 1st shows at the legendary A7 & had also played drums for the early NYHC band Major Conflict as well as in the unrecorded Rat Patrol w/Adam Mucci from Agnostic Front & Sacrilege NY. Major Conflict had a period where they played a more melodic Stiff Little Fingers influenced sound & I think that Ray carried on that sense of melody to A-Bomb-A-Nation. Being around since the 1st wave of HC allowed him to draw from older influences of melodic HC bands like the Posh Boy Southern California sound or 7 Seconds as opposed to a kid that just got into HC in ’87 & all they knew was stuff like Youth Of Today or Breakdown.

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CTM – Their lyrics were not really typical hardcore lyrics. I really like their meaningful lyrics, what do you think about them?
Freddy – I think the lyrics are really intelligent & well thought out. I will attribute that to Ray being older than us. When I first met him, I’d just finished High School & He was already out of college & working in the “real world”. I think that his life experience was a vital part of the lyrics, rising above more simplistic topics like you ‘stabbed me in the back’ or other like-minded fare of the day.

CTM – I heard that there is an unreleased Abombanation album that they recorded but never released. Have you ever heard these songs? Would you mind writing about this unreleased LP?
Freddy – I’ve never heard the unreleased lp& Ray said that he only heard about a couple of minutes of, he wasn’t too interested because it was after he quit the band. I would love to see the demos & maybe this lp to be released some day.

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CTM – Outburst played their first show with Abombanation at Right Track Inn in late 1987. As far as I know it was an amazing show where Ray Parada was covered in blood from busting his nose open during Outburst set. Were you on this show?
Freddy – Unfortunately I was not at this show, actually only made it out to the Right Track Inn only one time. I asked Ray about the blood on stage & he replied that was from catching an elbow to the nose during the opening band, seems he couldn’t get the bleeding under control when they went on. I’m sure it was quite a sight!

CTM – What is your opinion of the band name Abombanation? I saw a few flyers where it was mispelled. Which band name do you like the most off of New Breed? Mine is Beyond. I read that they chose the name because it represents the way they feel about drugs and any other barriers that weaken your life. To be beyond something is to overcome it, or to surpass it. Awesome band name!
Freddy – Yeah, that was an easy name for people to misspell! I love it though, really conveys a lot. I have to say ‘Life’s Blood’ is my favorite band name on the comp. It is such a strong name that, to me, really illustrates what Hardcore is & to an extension; anything you feel passionate about that inspires the very core of your being & affects your life for the long run. A close second is ‘Raw Deal’. That really captures a situation that happens to the best of us & the band’s music is a release from the emotions that go along with said predicament. I was so bummed when they were forced to change their name to Killing Time due to legal reasons. I still never call them by the KT name!

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CTM – Crucial Chaos on WNYU every Thursday night. An awesome radio show a lot of you in NYC grew up listening to. As I imagine it in the late ’80s you would sit in your room and use your boombox to record all the NYHC bands appearing on Crucial Chaos, live sets and interviews. I really love listening to live sets and radio sets. What do you think, was it any different playing a show and playing a live set on the radio? How should we imagine a WNYU or WMFU set?
Freddy – Listening to Crucial Chaos every Thursday night was such a looked forward to experience. DJ Spermicide had such a cool husky voice. A lot of kids definitely had a crush on her just based on her voice & radio personality. Her sidekick on air was Johnny Stiff, an old school Punk Rock dude who’d been around since the beginning & booked some legendary shows. He was famous for being cranky to people calling in to the show. That’s the thing, it was an epicenter of info for the scene. I would tape the whole show to catch up on new releases, get turned on to old classics, listen for show announcements, ticket giveaways, band interviews; not to mention the live sets that we all anxiously waited for & hit the “record” button.

CTM – “Everybody mosh it up Break everything in your house!” What are your favourite radio sets and why?
Freddy – My favorite NYU sets are by bands who I think it’s their best recorded stuff. For example, I’m not a huge Judge fan but I think their NYU is awesome, best thing I’ve heard by them. Same goes for Side By Side, their studio stuff is ok, but the live set is smoking. Others favorites that come to my mind is being @the studio when Fit Of Anger played & all our friends were there, that was really cool. The interviews are classic too, like YDL & Warzone, there are some choice quotes in there.

CTM – I read about an awesome place on 14th street in NYC called Giant Studios. Many well-known NYHC bands used to rehearse there including Krakdown, Warzone, Side By Side, Breakdown, Death Before Dishonor etc. There were rooms A through Z so you could just walk in and hang out and listen to each band rehearse. What are your memories of Giant Studios?
Freddy – Giant studios was a who’s who of NYHC bands rehearsing there at any given time. It was a great place to catch band members if you wanted to interview them. I remember doing a couple of interviews for my New Breed fanzine there. I actually rehearsed with a band called Last Cause there in late 1988 & right next to us Underdog was rehearsing & we saw Sick Of it All coming in as we walked out. I remember going to see my friends in Our Gang rehearse & it would become a live show with like 15-20 kids packed in the rehearsal room doing “stage dives”, moshing& generally goofing around. Great times all around.

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CTM – I heard a funny story about the singer of Uppercut. Steve Uppercut had no idea they were on this compilation until 2006 when he saw it somewhere on the internet. Do you have any funny stories about the New Breed comp.?
Freddy – That’s funny Steve never knew they were on the comp. I think he drifted out of the scene, like a lot if us did, by the 90’s. I dealt mostly with Robert Sefcik, the Uppercut drummer, as far as getting the Uppercut tracks & artwork for the comp. I see Steve all the time now, I do Acupuncture on him & go see his awesome band Kings Destroy that also features Robert on drums.

CTM – Could you talk about the concept of making the cover for New Breed? The picture looks like the Minor Threat EP but taken from the side.
Freddy – The picture of Chaka sitting on the steps on 8th st near the old Venus Records location is meant to be a homage to Minor Threat’s Lp cover. I took a side view of him, the better to show off the Crucifix patch Chaka had on his right shoulder as well as the Air Jordan sneakers he was sporting. That was basically the only idea we had, took a camera one day after shopping for records & went for it. It’s cool that a lot of people dig it, there’s also a tag on the door above by “Shoe”, that’s Rich from All For One & one of my best friends, so that was great that it turned out that way too. I always considered it as our urban tribute to an iconic HC image.

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CTM – Some Records was an awesome meetig place for hardcore kids, bands, zine editors and people that would help launch that second wave of NYHC in ’86. Would you mind sharing some memories about Some Records?
Freddy – Some Records was the catalyst for me getting really involved in the scene, otherwise I would have just been another passive spectator rather than an active participant. I saw a flyer on a lamppost in 1986 that said “American HC” & gave the store’s location. I immediately went down there & bought my first fanzines & demos. This inspired me to do my own fanzine called FTW. The first interview I ever did for my zine was with Ray Cappo right outside the store. I met Chaka through hanging out there. The inspiration for doing the New Breed comp comes from picking up the legendary Guillotine benefit comp tape there & wanting to do something along the same lines.
Some of my favorite memories:
– Duane unwrapping a brand new copy of the Straight Ahead 12″ & playing it nonstop like 10 times in a row.
– Waiting anxiously for the delivery guy to bring YOT’slp& being the 1st one to buy a blue vinyl copy.
– Having a listening party in the store to AF’s “Liberty & Justice” lp w/Nick YDL, John Life’s Blood, Tommy Carroll, Side By Side guys & Alleyway crew dudes.
There are too many good memories of that place. It really was the epicenter & communication hub of the scene, amazing in itself because the place was only about 300 Sq feet & located down inside a dusty basement but in my memory it is NYHC’s grand palace.

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CTM – I know that you are working on a documentary about New Breed and the bands on it. Any updates?
Freddy – The latest on the New Breed documentary is that we finally got a new video editor, gone through two already. This time it’s Sean Murphy, he sang for Collapse on the comp, so he definitely “gets it”. We just have to figure out a good time for all of us to sit down & get this wrapped up. Not so easy these days with families, jobs & other necessities of daily life. It will get done, there’s no timetable, just taking it one day at a time. Thanks for the interest, you will definitely hear more about it as it comes out. It was great reminiscing about these old days that still mean a lot to me. I hope I was able to shed some light on the A-Bomb-A-Nation story, thanks again!